Infant Research and Adult Treatment: Nonverbal Modes of Entering Distress Moments

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With the use of video illustrations, Dr. Beebe proposes that nonverbal modes of entering distress moments provide an organizing principle both of optimal infant development and of therapeutic action in adult treatment.

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Wednesday, April 10, 2019

7:30 PM - 9:30 PM

BPSI, 141 Herrick Road

Newton Centre, MA 02459




Infant Research and Adult Treatment: Nonverbal Modes of Entering Distress Moments

 

Increasingly research shows that the nonverbal dialogue in adult treatment is essential to therapeutic action. However, this nonverbal dimension has been difficult to conceptualize. Because the nonverbal dialogue remains remarkably similar across the lifespan, infant research on face-to-face interaction can inform the nonverbal dimension of interaction in adult treatment face-to-face or on the couch. Using film microanalysis, our research has documented rapid, nuanced, highly emotional mother-infant nonverbal dialogues at four months that lead to secure or disorganized infant attachment patterns at one year. We showed that maternal difficulties in “entering” and empathizing with infant distress, that is, forms of “denial” of infant distress, is a key feature in the origins of disorganized attachment. Disorganized attachment predicts young adult psychopathology, most notably dissociation. In contrast, modes of “entering” infant distress moments, such as brief facial or vocal expressions of sadness, joining the cry rhythm or joining the dampened state, or participating in subtle finger “dialogues,” are salient in the origins of secure attachment. These modes of entering infant distress make it more possible for the infant to sense that someone is on her wave-length, that her distressed state is recognized. We propose that nonverbal modes of entering the distress moments provide an organizing principle both of optimal infant development and of therapeutic action in adult treatment. How is this done? This lecture will provide video illustrations of nonverbal micro-processes of entering distress moments in infancy and in adult treatment. Adult treatment will be illustrated through videotaped sessions of an adult treatment case of Sandra who has not looked anyone in the eye since she was 12 years old (Sandberg & Beebe, 2019, in press). 



Speakers

Beatrice Beebe, PhD (Presenter) is Clinical Professor of Psychology (in Psychiatry), College of Physicians & Surgeons, Columbia University; Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, New York State Psychiatric Institute. She directs a basic research lab on mother-infant communication. She is faculty at several psychoanalytic institutes, and she has a private practice for adults and mother-infant pairs.

She is author or co-author of 6 books. The most recent is The mother-infant interaction picture book: Origins of attachment (Beebe, Cohen & Lachman, Norton, 2016). A documentary film about her research is available (website of the Psychoanalytic Electronic Publishing [PEPweb], Mother-Infant Communication: The Research of Dr. Beatrice Beebe, by Karen Dougherty, 2016).

 

Benjamin Herbstman, MD, MHS (Moderator) is a lecturer, part-time, at Harvard Medical School, an assistant psychiatrist at McLean Hospital, and a candidate at the Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute (BPSI). He has a private practice in Cambridge.



Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this program, participants will be able to:

  1. Identify the subtlety, rapidity and complexity of these early mother-infant interactions, and how each partner influences the other, second-by-second;
  2. Describe different patterns of 4-month interaction associated with secure vs. disorganized infant attachment;
  3. Describe modes of entering distress moments in infancy;
  4. Use the 4-month mother-infant interactions which illustrate modes of entering distress moments to draw analogies to adult therapist-patient interactions.



References

Beebe, B. & Lachmann, F. [with Markese, S., Buck, K., Chen, H., Cohen, P., Bahrick, L., Andrews, H. & Feldstein, S.] (2014). The origins of attachment: Infant research and adult treatment. NY: Routledge Press. 6.

Beebe, B., Cohen, P. & Lachmann, F. (2016). The mother-infant interaction picture book: Origins of attachment. New York: Norton Press.

Beebe, B., Jaffe, J., Markese, S., Buck, K., Chen, H., Cohen, P., Bahrick, L., Andrews, H., & Feldstein, S. (2010). The origins of 12-month attachment: A microanalysis of 4-month mother-infant interaction. Attachment & Human Development, 12 (1-2), 1-135.

Sandberg, L. & Beebe, B. (2019). A patient who does not look: A collaborative treatment with video feedback. Psychoanalytic Dialogues, in press.



Schedule
7:30 pm - 7:40 pm: Welcome & Introduction; 7:40 pm - 9:00 pm: Presentation; 9:00 pm - 9:30 pm: Discussion and Q&A.

This program is made possible by the generous support of BPSI Members and friends.
Your gift to BPSI supports psychotherapy education.  
To make a gift, please visit www.bpsi.org.



The target audience for this program is graduate students in the fields of psychology and socialwork and mental health clinicians at all levels of training.
 
FEE: $55 Early Bird (use code: EB2019COR); $65 Regular (as of 3/30/2019)
The fee is waived for Early Career Clinicians, and BPSI Members, Trainees, and Partners.
Scholarships available upon request.
 
 
Continuing Education 
Physicians: This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the Essential Areas and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education through the joint providership of the American Psychoanalytic Association and the Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute. The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians. The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 2 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s)™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity. IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE INFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters of this CME program have any relevant financial relationships to disclose. 
Psychologists: The Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute maintains responsibility for this program and its content. This program fulfills the requirements for 2 hours of CE. 
Please note: Per APA requirements, psychologists must attend 100% of a course in order to be eligible for continuing education credit.
Social Workers: Application for social work continuing education credtis has been submitted. Please contact us at office@bpsi.org or 617-266-0953 for the status of social work CE accreditation.
Please noe: Per NASW requirements, social workers must attend 80% of a course in order to be eligible for continuing education credit.
The Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 6913. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs. This program offers 2 NBCC Clock Hours.

 

Event Cancellation Policies & Procedures
Any program participant requesting their individual program registration be canceled, must submit their request in writing via email to Drew Brydon at dbrydon@bpsi.org. For fee-based events, a request for cancellation (and refund using the original form of payment) must be received no later than 48 hours in advance of the event. Requests received later than 48 hours prior to the event will not be processed or accepted. All approved refunds are subject to a $10.00 administrative fee. If BPSI cancels and event, all registrants will receive a full refund of fees paid (no administration charge) no later than two business days following the scheduled date of the event, using the original form of payment.

Grievance Policy
Please address any questions or concerns about your experience at this or any program or event you have attended at the Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute to the Program Chair, via the Senior Administrator/Continuing Education Administrator, BPSI, 141 Herrick Road, Newton Centre, MA 02459; office@bpsi.org; 617.266.0953.

The Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute, Inc., 141 Herrick Road, Newton Centre, MA 02459, does not discriminate on the basis of race, creed, color, sex, age, sexual orientation, national origin or handicap in the admissions, administration of its educational programs, scholarship programs or employment.

 

 

 

 

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