The Analyst’s Mortality: Risk, Possibility and Gift

In this paper, I address my personal experience of my analyst's sudden death, linking that loss to a subject the literature has long neglected: a striking fact that led me to wonder why the analyst’s mortality is so particularly avoided in our profession. The universal – “no one likes to think about death” – is only the surface.

This field is required.
This field is required.


 

Saturday, December 4, 2021
 
10:00 AM EST Online Program & Discussion
Online registration is required for this program. All registrants will receive a Zoom Meeting Link.
To receive Continuing Education, registration must be completed by Friday, December 3, 2021 at 10:00 AM EST.
 
The Annual S. Joseph Nemetz Lecture
 

[A]t bottom, no one believes in his own death . . .
​​​​​​​​--Freud (1915: 289)

 

In this paper, I address my personal experience of my analyst's sudden death, linking that loss to a subject the literature has long neglected: a striking fact that led me to wonder why the analyst’s mortality is so particularly avoided in our profession. The universal – “no one likes to think about death” – is only the surface. I also found it challenging to answer the questions: What, or whom, exactly, had I lost? What had I been given?

The experience of that stunning loss led me to consider paradoxes inherent to the psychoanalytic situation, and in the very nature of our work. Exploring those contradictions, over time, charts my personal route to becoming an analyst. Central in that process has been the double meaning of "mortal": The analyst is vulnerable (he or she can die) and also fallible (he or she can err). The analyst’s mortality underlies the work, at every moment – a robot or angel can’t do it. That same mortal nature also carries the potential for destruction. Thus, I was led to consider the issue of unethical behavior across a range: from mis-steps, to crimes.

I use the expression "mortal” gift to capture the double nature of the analyst's offering: Only a human being can give it, and the gift can be “lost” or corrupted. For me, writing about psychoanalysis has been, among other things, a productive form of mourning.

 

Speakers

Ellen Pinsky, PsyD (Presenter) 
Is a member of the Faculty at BPSI and is the author of Death and Fallibility in the Psychoanalytic Encounter: Mortal Gifts (Routledge, 2017).

Jane Kite, PhD (Discussant)
Is a Training and Supervising Analyst at BPSI and Associate Editor of the Journal of the American Psychoanalytic Association.

Alfred Margulies, MD (Discussant)
Is a Training and Supervising Analyst, BPSI; Associate Professor of Psychiatry (Part-Time), Harvard Medical School.

Janet Noonan, LICSW (Moderator)
Is a Training and Supervising Analyst and on the BPSI Faculty for both the Training Programs in Psychoanalysis and in Psychoanalytic Psychotherapy. She has a private practice in Cambridge, MA.

 

This program is made possible by the generous support of BPSI members and friends. Your gift to BPSI supports
psychoanalytic and psychotherapy education and ensures the future of our field. To make a gift, please visit www.bpsi.org.

 
The target audience for this program is mental health clinicians at all levels of training and members of the community.
 

Learning Objectives
At the conclusion of this program, participants will be able to:

  1. Describe two paradoxes that arise in the therapeutic situation.
  2. List two reasons the analyst’s mortality has not been actively addressed in the psychoanalytic literature.
  3. Identify and critique one way the analyst’s mortality impacts therapeutic technique.
  4. Describe Pinsky's concept of the double nature of the analyst’s offering: a mortal gift that is always vulnerable to corruption.

Schedule

10:00 AM– 10:10 Introductions; 10:10 AM – 10:50 Presentation; 10:50 AM- 11:10 Discussant; 11:10 AM – 11:30 Discussants; 11:30 AM-12:00 PM Discussion and Q and A.
 
About the S. Joseph Nemetz Memorial Lecture Series

The Nemetz Memorial Lecture honors the history of American psychoanalysis. Established in 2009, the annual lecture focuses on the importance of communal memory: the idea that we honor our origins as we progress and further develop psychoanalysis in the United States. Lectures in S. Joseph Nemetz’s spirit (reflective, community-minded, and open-minded) emphasize imaginative service to the profession.

 
Scholarships are available for BPSI programs.
FEE:
$85 Progrsm Fee
$75 Early Bird Special (available until 11/22/2021) Use Code at Checkout: EB2021RPG
 
 
Continuing Education 

Physicians: This activity has been planned and implemented in accordance with the accreditation requirements and policies of the Accreditation Council for Continuing Medical Education (ACCME) through the joint providership of the American Psychoanalytic Association and the Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute.  The American Psychoanalytic Association is accredited by the ACCME to provide continuing medical education for physicians.
The American Psychoanalytic Association designates this Live Activity for a maximum of 2 AMA PRA Category 1 Credit(s) ™. Physicians should claim only the credit commensurate with the extent of their participation in the activity.
IMPORTANT DISCLOSURE NFORMATION FOR ALL LEARNERS: None of the planners and presenters for this educational activity have relevant financial relationship(s)* to disclose with ineligible companies whose primary business is producing, marketing, selling, re-selling, or distributing healthcare products used by or on patients.
*Financial relationships are relevant if the educational content an individual can control is related to the business lines or products of the ineligible company.

-Updated June 2021-

Psychologists: The Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute is approved by the American Psychological Association to sponsor continuing education for psychologists. The Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute maintains responsibility for this program and its content. This program fulfills the requirements for 2 hours of CE. 
Please note: Per APA requirements, psychologists must attend 100% of a course in order to be eligible for continuing education credit.
 
Social Workers: Application for social work continuing education credits has been submitted. Please contact us at office@bpsi.org or 617-266-0953 for the status of social work CE accreditation.
Please note: Per NASW requirements, social workers must attend 80% of a course in order to be eligible for continuing education credit.
The Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute has been approved by NBCC as an Approved Continuing Education Provider, ACEP No. 6913. Programs that do not qualify for NBCC credit are clearly identified. The Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute is solely responsible for all aspects of the programs. This program offers 2 NBCC Clock Hours.

 

Event Cancellation Policies & Procedures
Any program participant requesting their individual program registration be canceled must submit their request in writing via email to Drew Brydon-Cardoso at dbrydon@bpsi.org. For fee-based events, a request for cancellation (and refund using the original form of payment) must be received no later than 48 hours in advance of the event. Requests received later than 48 hours prior to the event will not be processed or accepted. All approved refunds are subject to a $10.00 administrative fee. If BPSI cancels an event, all registrants will receive a full refund of fees paid (no administration charge) no later than two business days following the scheduled date of the event, using the original form of payment.

Grievance Policy
Please address any questions or concerns about your experience at this or any program or event you have attended at the Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute to the Program Chair, via the Senior Administrator/Continuing Education Administrator, BPSI, 141 Herrick Road, Newton Centre, MA 02459; office@bpsi.org; 617.266.0953.

The Boston Psychoanalytic Society and Institute, Inc., 141 Herrick Road, Newton Centre, MA 02459, does not discriminate on the basis of race, creed, color, sex, age, sexual orientation, national origin or handicap in the admissions, administration of its educational programs, scholarship programs or employment.